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MP3 Soundbites

Dr Maurer Revenue (16 sec)
Harold M. Maurer (MORE-ER), M.D., chancellor of the University of Nebraska Medical Center, talks about what the overall overall cancer center project would mean to Nebraska.

"The economic development opportunity here is phenomenal. It will bring in approximately $100 million dollars a year in new revenue to the state of Nebraska. And we will be able to recruit new faculty and staff."

 

Dr Maurer Transformation (17 sec)
Harold M. Maurer (MORE-ER), M.D., chancellor of the University of Nebraska Medical Center, talks about what the cancer center project would mean to Nebraska and the medical center.

"The cancer project is a transformational project for all Nebraskans and will position us to become a Comprehensive Cancer Center. The Cancer Center will also increase the number of patients that we see -- not only Nebraska, beyond Nebraska."

 

Dr. Maurer Bench to Bed (20 sec)
Harold M. Maurer (MORE-ER), M.D., chancellor of the University of Nebraska Medical Center, talks about how the cancer research tower part of the project would benefit the medical center and Nebraska.

"By having an attractive, brand new cancer facility where we focus on cancer translation-- from the bed to the bedside -- this allows us to recruit the best and the brightest. So I think it's a boon to the medical center and it's absolutely critical to the success of this project."

 

Fosdick One Location (8 sec)
Glenn Fosdick (FOZ-DICK), CEO of The Nebraska Medical Center, talks about the advantage of the overall cancer center project that would combine cancer research and patient care.

"We can focus all of our energy on one location so when the patient comes in, everything is there available to them."

 

Fosdick Access to Researchers (13 sec)
Glenn Fosdick (FOZ-DICK), CEO of The Nebraska Medical Center, talks about the importance of having research and cancer care together in one complex.

"Having access to the researchers who are working that closely with the practicing physicians provides and ensures that they have the most up-to-date possible treatments and considerations available to them everyday."

 

Fosdick Status (19 sec)
Glenn Fosdick (FOZ-DICK), CEO of The Nebraska Medical Center, talks about how the cancer center could help elevate the medical center's status in cancer care and research.

"It will help us to go beyond what is presently our certified cancer center status and reach what's called comprehensive cancer care status which basically ensures that the research and the care is being provided for collaboratively. There are less than 40 facilities in the country that have this qualification."

 

Cowan Therapies (14 sec)
Ken Cowan (COW-EN),, M.D., Ph.D., director of the University of Nebraska Medical Center, talks about why cancer research is important to Nebraskans.

"One out of every two Nebraskans will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. While there have been significant improvements in cancer treatments, research will lead to the next generation of therapies, which will be personalized cancer care for each individual patient diagnosed with cancer."

 

Cowan Therapies (11 sec)
Ken Cowan (COW-EN), M.D., Ph.D., director of the University of Nebraska Medical Center Eppley Cancer Center, talks about the benefits of a new cancer research tower

"It will enable us to put researchers in a laboratory next door to physicians seeing patients in a clinic. It will hasten the transfer of discoveries from the laboratory into new therapies for patients as quickly as possible."

 

Cowan Cost of Project (14 sec)
Ken Cowan (COW-EN),, M.D., Ph.D., director of the University of Nebraska Medical Center, talks about the cost and funding sources for the project.

"The overall cost of the project is about $370 million dollars. This will come from a collaboration between the hospital, which contributed about $120 million dollars. About $200 million dollars will come from private philanthropy and about $50 million dollars we hope will come from the state."