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Archive for 2006

UNMC’s Mamdani attends opening of Nebraska Center in Japan

 

UNMC Today-UNMC’s Nizar Mamdani was part of a 28-member delegation that joined Lt. Gov. Rick Sheehy on a trip to Japan last week to celebrate the opening of the Nebraska Center, the state’s first trade office in a foreign country. 

Mamdani, the executive director of the UNMC Office of International Healthcare Services, served as a representative for the medical center, which is one of the key sponsoring partners of the Nebraska Center.

 

He joined delegates from the state’s agriculture, business and educational communities as they discussed with Japanese officials ways in which Nebraska’s services and resources could benefit the island nation.

 

“This trip has been a valuable experience and this office will offer the university a multitude of opportunities,” Mamdani said.

 

UNMC has pledged to give up to $20,000 to the Nebraska Center — about a quarter of the funding needed to support the new operation.

 

Mamdani, Sheehy and the other delegates joined more than 200 Japanese business and government leaders at a Friday reception to commemorate the center’s opening.

 

The reception capped a five-day trade trip to Japan, which is home to the world’s second-largest economy and is the state’s top overseas trading partner.

 

“This office is an important step in our global strategy to market Nebraska to the next generation of entrepreneurs,” Gov. Dave Heineman said from Lincoln.

Dr. and Mrs. Armitage named "Samaritans of the Year"

by Chuck Brown, UNMC public affairs

 

A regional counseling center is making official Thursday what the UNMC community has known for a long time — James Armitage, M.D., and his wife, Nancy, are good Samaritans.

 

The Armitages will receive the “Samaritan of the Year Award” from the Samaritan Counseling Center of the Midlands at a Thursday dinner at Omaha’s Holiday Inn Central Convention Center, 3321 S. 72nd St.

 

The Armitages are being honored for their dedication to community service, as well as their contributions to the global community, said Nizar Mamdani, executive director of the Office of International Healthcare Services at UNMC and The Nebraska Medical Center.

 

“Dr. Armitage has spent countless hours organizing and providing no-cost training to 76 health care professionals from 18 countries, and has treated hundreds of individuals worldwide,” Mamdani said. “His patient care and insightful global vision inspired me to set up the International Healthcare program. He was one of my main supporters from the program’s inception and continues to motivate me today.”

 

Dr. Armitage is currently a professor of oncology-hematology at UNMC. He had served as dean of the College of Medicine from 2000 to 2003 and may be best known for starting the bone marrow transplant program at UNMC in 1982. Before becoming COM dean, he served 10 years as professor and chairman of the internal medicine department.

 

Dr. Armitage also is considered one of the world’s top experts on lymphoma.

 

Nancy Armitage has been involved with many volunteer organizations and community-service projects, including her current position on the board of directors of the Samaritan Counseling Center of the Midlands, a non-profit, interfaith counseling center that provides low-cost social service to those in need.

 

“Nancy and I are honored to receive such an award,” Dr. Armitage said. “What is important, though, is that this evening brings attention to the Samaritan Counseling Center and the good work it is doing in our community.”

 

No couple is more deserving of such an award, said UNMC Chancellor Harold M. Maurer, M.D., who will serve as master of ceremonies for Thursday’s dinner.

 

“Anytime is a good time to honor the Armitages,” Dr. Maurer said. “Their contributions to UNMC, the state and the world-at-large have made life better for many people. It’s an honor to be in a position to draw attention to this wonderful couple.”

 

Seating for the event, which starts with a reception at 6:15 p.m. followed by a dinner at 7 p.m., is limited. Contact Beth Eliason at 625-2733 for tickets.

November 2006-Dr. McCashland to lead international transplant group

The International Liver Transplantation Society has elected UNMC associate professor Timothy McCashland, M.D., as its president.

 

Dr. McCashland was sworn in recently at the 2006 International Congress in Milan, Italy.

 

Throughout his one-year term, he will be responsible for representing the society, monitoring the strategic direction of the organization, serving as a voice for the membership and acting on the members’ behalf. As president, one of his key responsibilities will be to help shape the future agenda and direction of the society.

 

“Volunteer leadership is a critical component to the success of any association, and ILTS is fortunate to have such a dedicated individual leading the society,” said Diann Stern, ILTS executive director. “We are confident Tim’s leadership and expertise will be an asset to ILTS and help ensure continued growth and success for the association moving forward.”

 

Dr. McCashland said it is an honor and privilege to serve the society.

 

“Its unique ability to bring to together leaders in the field of transplantation … is exciting,” Dr. McCashland said. “We look to expand our role in providing educational opportunities for physicians in training and to be an informational resource for patients and families concerning liver transplantation.”

 

Dr. McCashland earned his medical degree from UNMC in 1987 and completed his internal medicine residency at UNMC in 1990. He served a fellowship in gastroenterology at UNMC before completing a fellowship in therapeutic endoscopy at Western General Hospital in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1993. Dr. McCashland is board-certified in internal medicine and gastroenterology.

 

ILTS is an international organization dedicated to the advancement of the science and practice of liver transplantation. Since its inception in 1990, the goal of the society has been to raise the standard of care for patients requiring liver transplantation and to promote education and research by disseminating and exchanging information related to liver transplantation within the medical community, as well the public.

December 2006-Breast Cancer-Prediction For Future Treatment

Editorial by: James A. Edney, MD, Professor of Surgery and Chief of Surgical Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska.

 

The modern management of breast cancer is evolving at a rapid rate. This editorial outlines the treatment advances that the author anticipates within the next decade.

 Within the next several years the Nipple will become the new target for early detection. The nipple is uniquely positioned to provide this information. The intraductal approach via nipple fluid aspiration and ductal lavage of the tributaries, where most breast cancer originates, will become the “Pap Smear” for the breast allowing us to recognize early morphologic changes years before small cancers would be detectable by mammography. By accessing the nipple we will be able to identify breast cancer or its precursors up to four years before it would be detectable by mammography.

 

Those individuals with a suspicious or frankly positive ductal lavage will undergo “ductoscopy”. This technology has already been developed. A disposable micro-endoscope as small as 0.9 mm. in diameter with working channels allowing the introduction of diagnostic and therapeutic tools is already available. In addition to potentially identifying intraductal abnormalities years before they are visible by mammography, this technology will allow future surgeons to use this as an aid in planning the extent of surgical resection minimizing the amount of tissue requiring removal.

 

Work is underway to identify biomarkers for susceptibility to breast cancer or recognize those individuals who may be harboring an occult cancer too small to be identified even with the most sophisticated imaging technology available. In our own laboratory we are analyzing breast tissue specimens harvested from patients with and without breast cancer and have found estrogen metabolites and conjugates [e.g. 4-catechol estrogen] up to four times higher in breast cancer patients than in the non breast cancer controls. These results are the initial ones in studies designed to identify serum markers to identify those individuals with occult disease and those who are at greatest risk. Through Genetic Engineering strategies will be developed to prevent breast cancer altogether in selected subsets of patients.

 

Within the next 10 years lumpectomy for small tumors will be replaced by tissue ablation. The technology is currently available and feasibility trials are underway. Radio- Frequency ablation, technology that is widely available and commonly used in the management of neoplasms of the liver, is being evaluated as primary management of selected breast cancers. In this technique, the probe is percutaneously placed, usually by ultrasound guidance into the tumor. Thermal energy is produced as the ions in the breast tissue surrounding the prongs attempt to follow the alternating current, thus creating frictional heating. As a result the breast tissue itself, not the probe, creates the heat to destroy tumor cells.

 

Investigators are examining the role of tissue freezing as an alternative to surgical excision. Like Radio-Frequency ablation, cryoablation requires ultrasound visualization of the lesion for performance of the procedure.  Just as in the management of liver metastases, the objective is to visualize an “ice ball” around the lesion to assure adequate margins while preserving surrounding normal tissue.

 

Work is currently underway evaluating laser ablation of tumors using the same stereotactic guidance technology currently being used for minimally invasive breast biopsy. The Laser needle is inserted into the center of the tumor, the stylette is removed and the laser emitting optic fiber is inserted through the needle. A second probe is inserted parallel and 1 cm adjacent to the laser needle to monitor tissue temperature and a predetermined amount of laser energy is delivered to the tumor.

 

These methods of “ablative” therapy will be ideally suited for the treatment of the smaller tumors, less than 2 cms. in diameter, that are being detected with increasing frequency in screening programs and will replace surgical excision. As a cautionary aside, the surgeon with limited imaging skills will no longer be the primary provider for women with breast disease.

 

For many patients pondering their treatment options, the protracted five to six week course of radiation therapy, essential for breast conservation, weighs heavily in their decision to undergo mastectomy. Studying the pattern of clinical recurrence, over 80% of local recurrences after breast conservation surgery occur at the site of the original resection. Preliminary work indicates that localized radiation to the site of resection alone may produce equivalent results to whole breast radiation. Using simplistic technology already available, at the time of initial operation the surgeon may leave behind a catheter with a balloon attached to the end within the cavity of resection. The balloon is then loaded through the catheter with a radioactive agent for five to ten minute treatments twice a day for five days.

 

If 5 days seems too long, intraoperative radiotherapy will replace postoperative treatment. Umberto Veronesi from Milan has done preliminary trials with breast conserving surgery plus intraoperative radiation. He has shown that it is possible to deliver up to 21 Gy intraoperatively, which biologically is identical to the 55 Gy of external beam treatments now being used.

 

Within several years it will be possible to offer all local and regional therapy including tumor ablation, axillary sentinel node biopsy, and intraoperative radiotherapy, providing all local regional treatment in a one hour operation as opposed to the 8-10 weeks now necessary.

 

As we gain a better understanding of the genetic aspects of breast cancer and the specific prognostic indicators for selected patients that promote local recurrence and facilitate the development of systemic metastases, we will develop “smart drugs”, such as Herceptin that will attack specific genetic abnormalities for appropriate patients, eliminating the need for the current “shotgun” approach used to treat large numbers of patients with cytotoxic agents. Basically Herceptin is a “smart drug” which blocks the Her-2/neu receptors on the surface of the cell of those individuals who have been identified as “overexpressing” the Her-2/neu gene and prevents growth factor molecules from attaching.

 

Within the next 30 years our current approach to breast cancer will be obsolete. Public health screening of 90% of the women with more sophisticated breast imaging, including digital mammography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging will further reduce the mortality to the 10% range. “Pap Smears” of the breast using ductal lavage in concert with ductal endoscopy will identify breast cancers at such an early stage that we will be able to treat over 90% of patients with “minimallistic” procedures using radiofrequency probes, laser ablation, or cryotherapy probes under stereotactic guidance. In these early tumors axillary metastases will be uncommon and will be detected by sentinel node biopsy. Axillary node dissection will be rarely indicated.

 

Mastectomy will be reserved for the rare patient with multi focal cancer or therapeutically resistant or recurrent cancer. Patients will receive localized radiation therapy delivered intraoperatively only to the excision site to sterilize the surgical margins. Many patients will be able to avoid radiation therapy altogether because of the extremely small size of the tumor.

 

Medical oncologists will treat many fewer breast cancer patients and of those, most will receive “smart drugs” based on genetic indicators as opposed to cytotoxic chemotherapy. New drugs will be custom designed to treat specific genetically identified abnormalities. Anti-angiogenic compounds or gene manipulation of selected patients will offer possible hope for the small number of patients with metastatic disease.

 

Within the next 15-20 years current treatment will be unrecognizable. Just as we now recall the “Halsted Era” when insufficiently radical breast surgery was considered nothing less than surgical cowardice, within the next several decades we will look back at the treatment modalities we are using today as drachonian and unnecessarily mutilating.

New opportunities overseas

By Dave Heineman, Governor of Nebraska

 

Dear Fellow Nebraskans:
To seize the opportunities of global commerce, the Nebraska Department of Economic Development, the University of Nebraska Medical Center and several Nebraska companies have developed a new public-private partnership to open Nebraska’s first international trade office.

 

As one of Nebraska’s leading export markets, and the largest overseas market, Japan holds tremendous promise for our state, and the office will be located in the heart of Tokyo’s business district.

 

We want to enhance Nebraska’s opportunities for international trade, and Japan continues to present excellent opportunities for a number of industries in our state.

 

Prior to its ban on U.S. beef in 2003, Japan was our top export market for Nebraska beef. Yet even without the opportunity to sell beef products there during the past two years, Japan remained the largest overseas market for Nebraska exporters, particularly those in the manufacturing industry. Nebraska merchandise export shipments in 2004 totaled $2.3 billion dollars. With $193 million of that going to Japan, it represents a very significant market for our state.

 

In addition to pursuing opportunities to promote Nebraska products, we are also interested in efforts to increase foreign investment in our state. Today there are more than 30 Japanese-owned businesses in Nebraska. We want to continue to recruit new businesses here to our state, in addition to helping Nebraska agricultural producers and trade groups regain ground now that the doors for importing U.S. beef have been reopened in Japan.

 

The Nebraska Center will be a key asset for our state. Japanese companies place a high priority on personal relationships with those they do they business, so having a physical presence in the country is an important step in our efforts to expand opportunities for trade. This new international trade office will enable us to work more closely with Japanese companies on business investment and development efforts.

 

The center will be responsible for the promotion of Nebraska products and services in Japan and across the region. It will also serve as a resource to assist in research, contact and arrange meetings with Japanese business and trade officials, aid in travel and translation needs, and develop marketing efforts for Japanese consumers.

 

We will hold an open house to celebrate the grand opening of The Nebraska Center just a few weeks. Lt. Gov. Rick Sheehy will lead a delegation traveling to Tokyo for the event, and I am pleased that the executive director chosen to head the center will be joining him.

 

Mr. Koji Nagasaka has spent most of his career at the Itochu Corporation, which is one of Japan’s largest trading houses. He is highly respected in Japan, and that was clear during the U.S. Midwest-Japan trade conference hosted earlier this fall, which was attended by representatives of Japanese companies, U.S. business and economic development leaders and trade officials.

 

The Tokyo office will serve as a hub for Nebraska’s international business operations in Japan, including the recruitment and expansion of Japanese-owned companies, agricultural market expansion and development of partnerships for economic growth.

 

Nebraska has had a strong relationship with Japan. With the opening of this office, we hope to pursue an even stronger partnership in the years ahead by helping Nebraskans to work more closely with Japanese companies.

 

With the increasing interest in the global economy, developing and expanding our trade relationships abroad is vital for a stronger Nebraska, and it is opportunities such as this that will help us in accomplishing that goal.

October 2006-New Nebraska Center opened in Tokyo, Japan

Gov. Dave Heineman Friday announced the official opening of the new 565 square foot Nebraska Center in Tokyo, Japan.

 

Led by Executive Director Koji Nagasaka, six Nebraska Center staffers will promote the state’s products and services, participate in Japanese trade shows, introduce Nebraska and Japanese business owners and operators, conduct market research, undertake marketing campaigns and other focused activities that help the state compete there.
 

“Nebraska has had a strong relationship with Japan,” Gov. Heineman said. “With the opening of this office, we hope to pursue an even stronger partnership over the long-term by enabling Nebraskans to work more closely with Japanese companies on business investment and development efforts. The Japanese place a high importance on personal relationships and interactions, and having a physical presence in the country is essential to expanding our opportunities for trade.”

 

Joining the Governor for the announcement were Nagasaka, Richard Baier, director of the Nebraska Department of Economic Development (DED), and Nizar Mamdani, executive director of the Office of International Healthcare Services at UNMC and The Nebraska Medical Center, two of the many organizations supporting the effort.
The center is located in the Shinjuku District, a business hub known for its high-rise landscape, including the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Towers. Located a short walking distance away is Japan’s busiest railway station, Shinjuku Station, which transports 2 million passengers daily.

 

“The international program at the medical center has grown to over 100 strategic global partners in 41 countries and each year facilitates bringing hundreds of international patients for treatment, as well as many international researchers, students and prominent speakers to Nebraska,” Mamdani said.

 

“Having a physical presence in Japan is truly a key for further expansion of the medical center’s Asian initiatives in the areas of patient care, research, biomedical, biotechnology, education and training. We know that the establishment of this office will drive our strategic international programs to the next level,” Mamdani said.

Nebraskans who are in Japan conducting business can use the office’s computer, telephone, fax and other services between meetings and travel.

 

Among the Trade Offices’ many services are researching, contacting and meeting with potential Japanese partners, providing basic translation and interpreting services, assisting with trade shows, marketing entry strategy recommendations, providing in-country assistance and selective visits with companies, assisting with hotel and travel needs, and coordinating meetings with Commercial Attache, JETRO, Shizuoka, and other Japanese partners.

 

“Mr. Nagasaka’s experience will be key to helping Nebraska achieve its full potential in Japan,” Gov. Heineman said. “The Japanese place a very high importance on personal interactions and spend a great deal of time building relationships and developing trust.”

 

Nagasaka was employed for most of his career at Itochu Corporation, the world’s 17th largest company, and one of Japan’s largest trading houses involved in the aerospace, textile, agricultural, biotech, chemical, logistics and bio fuels industries. For 17 years, he worked at Itochu offices in New York and Chicago, as manager of the Oilseeds section, and executive vice president of Cigra Inc., a subsidiary company of Itochu, in grain collection and export, respectively.

 

His main activity was exporting U.S. agriculture products to Japan. He also traded with Brazil, China, Denmark, Norway and Germany. While living in Japan, he managed Itochu’s Soybean Section. During his time in New York, he was transferred to Cargill Incorporated and stationed in several different cities, including Central City, Neb., to learn more about grain distribution in the U.S.

 

Nagasaka also served as president of Kamigumi Air Cargo Service Inc., an Itochu logistics subsidiary, and as executive vice president and owner representative of Kato Real Estate Corp., another Itochu subsidiary. Most recently, he served as deputy secretary general for Itochu Shayu-Kai, a nonprofit organization serving retired employees of Itochu Corporation.

 

In addition to DED and UNMC, other center partners include Election Systems and Software, Omaha; Lincoln Chamber of Commerce; Nebraska Diplomats, Lincoln; Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce; First National Bank, Omaha; Oxbow Pet Products, Murdoch; Bruckman Rubber, Hastings; Werner Enterprises, Omaha; Nebraska Corn Board, Lincoln; Kawasaki, Lincoln; Nebraska Public Power District, Columbus; and Omaha Public Power District, Omaha.

New Nebraska Center opened in Tokyo, Japan

Gov. Dave Heineman Friday announced the official opening of the new 565 square foot Nebraska Center in Tokyo, Japan.

 

Led by Executive Director Koji Nagasaka, six Nebraska Center staffers will promote the state’s products and services, participate in Japanese trade shows, introduce Nebraska and Japanese business owners and operators, conduct market research, undertake marketing campaigns and other focused activities that help the state compete there.

 

“Nebraska has had a strong relationship with Japan,” Gov. Heineman said. “With the opening of this office, we hope to pursue an even stronger partnership over the long-term by enabling Nebraskans to work more closely with Japanese companies on business investment and development efforts. The Japanese place a high importance on personal relationships and interactions, and having a physical presence in the country is essential to expanding our opportunities for trade.”

 

Joining the Governor for the announcement were Nagasaka, Richard Baier, director of the Nebraska Department of Economic Development (DED), and Nizar Mamdani, executive director of the Office of International Healthcare Services at UNMC and The Nebraska Medical Center, two of the many organizations supporting the effort.
The center is located in the Shinjuku District, a business hub known for its high-rise landscape, including the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Towers. Located a short walking distance away is Japan’s busiest railway station, Shinjuku Station, which transports 2 million passengers daily.

 

“The international program at the medical center has grown to over 100 strategic global partners in 41 countries and each year facilitates bringing hundreds of international patients for treatment, as well as many international researchers, students and prominent speakers to Nebraska,” Mamdani said.

 

“Having a physical presence in Japan is truly a key for further expansion of the medical center’s Asian initiatives in the areas of patient care, research, biomedical, biotechnology, education and training. We know that the establishment of this office will drive our strategic international programs to the next level,” Mamdani said.

 

Nebraskans who are in Japan conducting business can use the office’s computer, telephone, fax and other services between meetings and travel.

 

Among the Trade Offices’ many services are researching, contacting and meeting with potential Japanese partners, providing basic translation and interpreting services, assisting with trade shows, marketing entry strategy recommendations, providing in-country assistance and selective visits with companies, assisting with hotel and travel needs, and coordinating meetings with Commercial Attache, JETRO, Shizuoka, and other Japanese partners.

 

“Mr. Nagasaka’s experience will be key to helping Nebraska achieve its full potential in Japan,” Gov. Heineman said. “The Japanese place a very high importance on personal interactions and spend a great deal of time building relationships and developing trust.”
Nagasaka was employed for most of his career at Itochu Corporation, the world’s 17th largest company, and one of Japan’s largest trading houses involved in the aerospace, textile, agricultural, biotech, chemical, logistics and bio fuels industries. For 17 years, he worked at Itochu offices in New York and Chicago, as manager of the Oilseeds section, and executive vice president of Cigra Inc., a subsidiary company of Itochu, in grain collection and export, respectively.

 

His main activity was exporting U.S. agriculture products to Japan. He also traded with Brazil, China, Denmark, Norway and Germany. While living in Japan, he managed Itochu’s Soybean Section. During his time in New York, he was transferred to Cargill Incorporated and stationed in several different cities, including Central City, Neb., to learn more about grain distribution in the U.S.

 

Nagasaka also served as president of Kamigumi Air Cargo Service Inc., an Itochu logistics subsidiary, and as executive vice president and owner representative of Kato Real Estate Corp., another Itochu subsidiary. Most recently, he served as deputy secretary general for Itochu Shayu-Kai, a nonprofit organization serving retired employees of Itochu Corporation.

 

In addition to DED and UNMC, other center partners include Election Systems and Software, Omaha; Lincoln Chamber of Commerce; Nebraska Diplomats, Lincoln; Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce; First National Bank, Omaha; Oxbow Pet Products, Murdoch; Bruckman Rubber, Hastings; Werner Enterprises, Omaha; Nebraska Corn Board, Lincoln; Kawasaki, Lincoln; Nebraska Public Power District, Columbus; and Omaha Public Power District, Omaha.

Students sought for international conference in Beijing

by Walter Brooks, UNMC public affairs
The Asia Pacific Rim Development Program (APRDP), inaugurated in early 2005 with the signing of a historic Memorandum of Understanding between UNMC and two of China’s leading biomedical institutions, will enter its second stage in June.

 

Applications are now being accepted for the selection of 12 students to attend the International Student Forum in Beijing, China, June 30-July 2. Some participants also will stay to represent UNMC at the 15th World Congress of Pharmacology July 2-7.

 

The forum will bring together students from the United States, China and Japan. In addition to UNMC, the institutions represented will be the Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Science (GUCAS) and Tokyo University. The forum will feature research presentations by the students, extensive networking opportunities and collaboration on research. China and Japan also will have 12 to 15 students attending. Students from all three nations will take part in special opening and closing ceremonies.

 

This is the third year for the annual forum, but the first invitation for UNMC.

 

-From left: Kai Fu, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor, John Chan, M.D., professor, both in UNMC’s Department of Pathology and Microbiology , and Hai Zheng, a visiting student from SJTUSM. Drs. Fu and Chan served as student faculty advisers.

“This is an opportunity for UNMC students to participate in significant international events with students from China and Japan,” said Don Leuenberger, vice chancellor for business and finance at UNMC. “UNMC is fortunate to be invited to these events, and we are working hard to develop a lasting relationship with these two nations, which are very important to Nebraska’s future. GUCAS and Tokyo University are world-class institutions, and this is a unique opportunity for UMNC students.”

 

Abbey Maul, a current graduate student in UNMC’s Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, is excited about the upcoming meeting. ” The forum is an incredible opportunity for all students who are able to attend. Not only will we develop valuable connections with other student researchers across the globe, but also act as representatives of the scientific research conducted in the United States today.”

 

The invitation represents the second phase of UNMC’s participation in APRDP. The first phase brought three Chinese medical students – Xizhe Ding, Jiayao Lin and Hai Zheng – for a three-month rotation, and Hongmei Tang, M.D., deputy dean of academic affairs from the Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTUSM), for four months. One of the UNMC faculty advisers to the Chinese students — Huiling Pang, M.D., Ph.D, assistant professor in the department of anesthesiology — said it is now UNMC’s turn to learn from their Chinese counterparts in China.

 

“The first phase was a great success. APRDP initiates a much more formal and regular collaboration in research and education between our respective medical schools,” Dr. Pang said.
-From left: Jiayao Lin, a visiting student from SJTUSM, and Huiling Pang, M.D., Ph.D, assistant professor, department of anesthesiology. Dr. Pang served as a student faculty adviser.

As one of the clinical advisers, Dr. Pang provided personalized attention to the exchange students as they learned fundamental clinical skills and American professionalism. The students worked closely with program administrators and clinical advisors throughout their rotations, she said. “Clinical and research issues, as well as daily cultural differences between the two nations, were discussed frequently. All of these interactions benefit the students in developing comfort, proficiency and compassion and the meaning of patient-centered care,” she said.

 

“Now, UNMC faculty and students have the opportunity to visit medical and graduate schools in China and compare and contrast medical education and practice in America with that of other nations,” Dr. Pang said. “This overseas experience will certainly help UNMC students develop a more global perspective and approach to medical education and clinical practice. This is another step in helping UNMC graduates compete and interact globally in medicine and research.”

 

Jialin Zheng, M.D., the director of UNMC Asia Pacific Rim Developmental Program, and an associate professor of the UNMC Departments of Pharmacology/Experimental Neuroscience and Pathology/Microbiology, said the APRDP program established to enhance UNMC’s outreach toward China and the Asian-Pacific regions – currently areas now undergoing massive economic growth.

 

“The experiences gained and friendships established through this collaboration will add to UNMC’s stature as a “world class” medical institution,” Dr. Zheng said. “Ultimately, the efforts, similar to long-term collaborative efforts with European biomedical institutions, will bring more opportunities, as well as academic and economic success, to all participants. This international forum represents another event in our continuous effort toward enhancing our outreach to the global scientific community and will further the UNMC mission to build a world class institution in this century.”
The forum is open to all UNMC students, with particular emphasis on students in Graduate Studies. All college students are encouraged to apply. All student participants will be required to give a presentation regarding their research during the forum.

 

Attendees will be selected by a student and faculty panel based upon the submitted abstracts. Students from every departmental area are encouraged to apply in order to represent the broad spectrum of research being conducted at UNMC. For additional information about APRDP, visit the APRDP Web site.

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