What kinds of children have been treated in the past in this program? Are there other children who have problems similar to those of my child?

What is the expertise of the people who are treating my child?

What is the typical length of stay for day treatment?

Will my child be eating like other children his/her age when (he/she) leaves the program?

Do you use force-feeding?

How are treatment decisions made?

How will you use hunger to get my child to eat?

Can other caregivers (teachers, grand caregivers) come in to observe and receive training?

How often do I need to be at the center?

Can I bring my other children too?

What is the success rate for the program?

What kinds of children have been treated in the past in this program? Are there other children who have problems similar to those of my child?
You are not alone. Lots of children have feeding problems. We generally see the children with the most severe problems. A few examples include gastroschisis, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), severe food selectivity, gastrostomy-tube dependence, total food refusal, feeding skill deficits, and organ transplants.

What is the expertise of the people who are treating my child?
All of the professionals on the team are licensed in their respective disciplines (e.g., psychology, speech, nutrition, and genetics). The staff who work directly with the children have specialized training with children with feeding disorders.

What is the typical length of stay for day treatment?
The length of stay is based on the patient's progress in the program.  Other factors, such as medical condition, can sometimes affect the length of the admission. The average admission in the day treatment program lasts approximately 40 days (eight weeks).

Will my child be eating like other children his/her age when (he/she) leaves the program?
Depending on the severity of your child's feeding difficulty, your child may not be eating like other children upon discharge.  Although the long-term goal is almost always to have your child eating like other children, this process may take some time (i.e., 2 to 4 years).  The length of time will likely depend on the child’s motivation to eat and chewing skills, but we will strive to reach age typical or developmentally appropriate eating.

Do you use force-feeding?
No. We teach care providers to set and maintain the necessary dietary limits for their child to grow. We will teach you procedures to (a) decrease your child’s disruptive mealtime behaviors, (b) increase your child’s acceptance of foods and liquids, and (c) help your child build the necessary skills for successful eating.

How are treatment decisions made?
Our program collects objective data during every session.  The interdisciplinary team reviews these data daily to evaluate the child's progress.  All of our treatment decisions are based upon the data we collect.

How will you use hunger to get my child to eat?
We schedule feedings to increase the likelihood that your child will eat during therapy.

Can other caregivers (teachers, grand caregivers) come in to observe and receive training?
Yes! We are certainly willing to help train as many of your child's caregivers as possible. If there are other adults, such as a therapist, teacher, baby-sitter, or other relative who routinely feeds your child and you would like to have that individual trained, please discuss this with your child's primary therapist.

How often do I need to be at the center?
Caregivers need to be here the first three days of the admission, during the time we train you to implement the treatments, and when we visit your home at the end of the admission. We encourage caregivers to be here throughout all steps of your child’s admission, but if accommodations need to be made, please discuss this with your child’s primary therapist.

Can I bring my other children too?
Yes, but they must be supervised at all times. We are unable to provide child care for siblings.

What is the success rate for the program?
The Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program at the Munroe-Meyer Institute has a 90.5% success rate based on the results of 64 children who were admitted to the program from August 2006 to July 2012. In other words, 90.5% of goals that are set upon admission are met. We measure patient success in a variety of areas (e.g., total amounts the child eats by mouth, decrease in tube feedings, decrease in inappropriate mealtime behaviors, caregiver training). Together, the feeding team and family develop the specific goals for each child. Goals are established for both the clinic and for the home. For those patients who have a total goal for the amount they eat by mouth (PO), 85.7% of them meet the goal by the end of the admission and 97.6% of the patients have some increase in total PO during the day treatment admission. In addition, the majority of patients are able to meet their decrease in tube feeding goal by the end of their admission. We also have been successful in decreasing inappropriate mealtime behaviors and training caregivers to implement the final treatment protocol with high integrity (90% or better). Overall, patients who have been admitted to the day treatment program have been highly successful and continue to make improvements in the outpatient program.

To make an appointment
Phone: (402) 559-7039
Toll Free: (800) 656-3937 ext. 97039
Fax: (402) 559-5004

NOTE: An evaluation will not be scheduled until you complete the screening form.  Once you complete and submit the form, a staff member will contact you to schedule an appointment.
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