Nurse Educator Training

Why you should train as a nursing teacher

  • Strong demand
    • The nation's critical nursing shortage reflects a shortage of nursing faculty.
    • Nursing schools need qualified teachers.  
  • Career satisfaction
    • Help solve our state and nationwide nursing shortage.
    • Prepare, guide and mentor tomorrow's nurse leaders
  • Flexible entry options
    Students may seek the nurse educator training through one of two pathways: 
    1. Concurrent preparation as an advanced practice nurse in one of the college's master's programs. See MSN specialty tracks.
    2. Through doctoral level (PhD or DNP) cognates required for students enrolled in the college's doctoral programs.
    3. As teacher training for RNs who already have a master's degree.
  • Stimulating curriculum
    There are four nurse educator courses for a total of 12 credits. 
COURSE TITLE CREDITS
NRSG 691 Designing and Evaluating Learner-Centered Curricula 3 cr
NRSG 692 Teaching & Learning Strategies 3 cr
NRSG 693 Using Technology to Enhance Teaching & Learning Strategies 3 cr
NRSG 694 Implementation of the Educator Role: Practicum 3 cr
  TOTAL for Nurse Educator Training     12 cr

 

Course offering schedule 

NRSG   691 692 693 694
2011 Summer     X X
Fall X X   X
 
2012 Spring   X   X
Summer     X X
Fall X     X
 
2013 Spring   X   X
Summer     X X
Fall X     X

For course descriptions, click here.  

“Nurses are essential partners in our health care delivery system. We cannot train and retain skilled nurses without first ensuring sufficient numbers of qualified nursing instructors.”  

— President Barack Obama • March 26, 2009  

For more information: will.roberts@unmc.edu  

To apply:  

PhD students — apply online: UNMC Graduate Studies  

MSN students — See MSN page for application instructions

PMC students — See Post-Master's page for application instructions  

UNMC alum is national advocate:Urgent need for nurses and nursing faculty.
  Susan Hassmiller, RN, PhD, FAAN   A 1983 MSN alum, Susan Hassmiller, RN, PhD, FAAN, is the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's senior adviser for nursing. Among her duties: shape and lead strategies to address nurse and nurse faculty shortages.   She is also director the RWJF Initiative on the Future of Nursing at the Institute of Medicine. It was formed to identify new solutions for nursing in recruitment, education, retention and new technologies; in delivery of nursing services across care settings; and in interprofessional training. Her objective: ensure that nursing, armed with solutions, plays a central role in health care reform — and in elevating the quality of patient care.  

The future of nursing education: Six questions with Sue. 

"It is well documented that we need more faculty, and we'll need even more in the future."

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