S. James Booth, Ph.D.

Department Affiliations
Associate Professor

Interests
Medical Education

My primary responsibility is the education of medical and pharmacy students in the area of microbiology. One of my principal goals is to strive to improve our medical students performance on Part 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE). Our students scores on the USMLE have been steadily improving over the years. Although our scores are above the national average, we are working to improve the scores even further. I have a web page that serves as a primary microbiology resource for second year medical students. Students can take quizzes, communicate with faculty, access faculty resources (notes, PowerPoint presentations, etc.), post their own information, and access Internet links. This web page serves a primary resource for microbiology for students in my microbiology course for pharmacy and for graduate students.

The Introduction to Disease Processes Core is the first course in the second year curriculum for the medical students. This core serves as an introduction to the basic concepts of pathology, microbiology, immunology, pharmacology, and nutrition. In my role as the Core Director, I function not only as the administrator of the core, but I also participate in assuring that all basic concepts in these disciplines are current and adequately covered. This is done not only by working in close contact with the faculty, but also by addressing the concerns of the students, including acting on real and perceived weaknesses in our curriculum after our students sit for the USMLE. One method I have found that works well in quickly strengthening the curriculum is to develop Problem Based Learning (PBL) cases that emphasize any areas of weakness. As an active facilitator in PBL and a case writer/reviewer, I can further ensure that the basic science concepts are adequately covered, especially in the area of microbiology.

My role as a facilitator in the Integrated Clinical Experience (ICE) has served me well in developing clinical correlations in the area of microbiology. ICE is a patient-centered curriculum that allows the students to learn interviewing and other clinical skills. By participating in ICE, I have improved my ability to teach basic microbiology with a clinical orientation. Frequent attendance to national medical student educational meetings and workshops has helped me to develop a keen understanding of the microbiology knowledge objectives expected of medical students for part 1 of the USMLE. I use this information as a guide in developing the microbiology education objectives at UNMC. My most recent teaching awards include the UNMC Outstanding Teaching Award, 2003 (chosen by the Faculty Senate), and the Hirschmann Award for Teaching Excellence Golden Apple Award (chosen by the graduating medical student class of 2003, and American Medical Student Association, Sophomore Class, 2004).

Education and Training
B.A. (Microbiology) University of Iowa, 1968
Ph.D. (Microbiology) University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 1975
Postdoctoral research associate, Anaerobe Lab, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1975-77

Teaching Activities
Medical Students: Year Two Director; Core Director (Introduction to Disease Processes); Lecturer, small group discussion facilitator, and laboratory director on microbiology; Facilitator in Problem Based Learning; Facilitator in Integrated Clinical Experience; Lecturer in Clinical Pathology Senior Selective; USMLE review lectures on bacteriology
Pharmacy Students: Course Director and lecturer, Medical Microbiology

National Activities
Reviewer, Medical Science Educator (formerly Journal of the International Association of Medical Science Educators).
Sat on Program Committee in 2006, 2008 and 2010 for the four day workshop for medical school microbiology & immunology educators “Teaching Medical Microbiology and Immunology to Medical Students,” held in Myrtle Beach, SC. Additionally, Session Speaker “Core Objectives: Fundamental/Basic Microbiology” and the Workshop Director “Core Objectives: Fundamental/Basic Microbiology.”
Web Moderator for the international resource "Fundamental/Basic Microbiology Core Objectives," accessed at http://mmi.creighton.edu/CoreObjectives/

Notable Publications
Booth, S.J. Microbiology Pearls of Wisdom, 2nd ed., 2010. Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Sudbury, MA

Booth, SJ, Burges, G, Justement, L, and Knoop, F. Design and Implementation of Core Knowledge Objectives for Medical Microbiology and Immunology. Journal of the International Association of Medical Science Educators (JIAMSE), 19 (3): 100-138, 2009
Link to PDF.

Booth, SJ, Justement, L, Burges, G, and Knoop, F. A Process for the Development of Core Objective Guidelines for Teaching Medical Microbiology and Immunology. Journal of the International Association of Medical Science Educators (JIAMSE), 19 (2): 39-40, 2009
Link to PDF.

Booth, SJ. Listeria and Erysipelothrix infections, xPharm, eds. D.B. Bylund and S.J. Enna, Elsevier Science Inc. 2004.

Booth, SJ. Diseases caused by Actinomyces species, xPharm, eds. D.B. Bylund and S.J. Enna, Elsevier Science Inc. 2004.

Booth, SJ. Chyseobacterium and related genera infections, xPharm, eds. D.B. Bylund and S.J. Enna, Elsevier Science Inc. 2004.

Booth, SJ. Pasteurella infections, xPharm, eds. D.B. Bylund and S.J. Enna, Elsevier Science Inc. 2004.

Booth, SJ. Fusobacterium infections, xPharm, eds. D.B. Bylund and S.J. Enna, Elsevier Science Inc. 2004.

Booth, SJ. Bordetella pertussis infections, xPharm, eds. D.B. Bylund and S.J. Enna, Elsevier Science Inc. 2004.

Booth, S.J. Microbiology Pearls of Wisdom. Boston Medical Publishing, Inc., Boston, MA, 2000.

S. James Booth, Ph.D.
S. James Booth, Ph.D.
Email Address
jbooth@unmc.edu

Mailing Address
986595 Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha, NE 68198-6595

Office Address
MSC 2017B

Phone Numbers
Office: 402-559-7706

Fax
402-559-4077

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