Nanoscale Imaging

Nanoscale imaging allows to follow the topography of the molecules, nanoparticles,  molecular ensembles, cells in air and in liquid. 

Click on the image to see a larger, more detailed image. 

 Fig 1  Fig 2
Fig 1. 3D AFM image in air of supercoiled plasmid DNA. Fig 2. 3D AFM image in air of reconstituted chromatin.
Fig 3  Fig 4
Fig 3. 3D AFM image in air of protein DNA complex : SfI protein binds 2 DNA recognition sites forming looped complexes. Fig 4. 3D AFM image in air of protein DNA complex : EcoRII protein binds 3 DNA recognition sites forming a “bow” type complex.
Fig 5 Fig 6
Fig 5. AFM image in air of aggregated small peptide at pH 5.6 after 96 hours of incubation deposited on hydrophobic surface. Fig 6. AFM image in air of tubulin. Sample was provided by Dr. O. Lockridge, the Eppley Institute, NE, USA.
Fig 7 Fig 8
Fig 7. AFM image in air of 70%
cross linked block copolymer. Sample was provided by Dr. T. Bronich, University of Nebraska Medical Center, USA.
Fig 8. AFM image in air presents ribbon-like structure surrounding the base of a mitochondrion from rat heart. Sample was provided by Dr. K. Bidasee, University of Nebraska Medical Center, USA.
Fig 9 (L) Fig 9 (R)
Fig 9. 3D AFM image of polymer micelle in air (left) and in liquid (right). Experiment demonstrates the swelling of the micelle. Sample was provided by Dr. T. Bronich, University of Nebraska Medical Center, USA.

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