Bioengineering

Srivatsan Kidambi, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering
University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Dr. Kidambi research interests focus on the development of novel nanostructured materials with highly controlled architectures and chemistries for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. These polymer based materials can be used to engineer in situ models of tissues including liver, brain and cancer. The materials developed through this research will address some of the key challenges of regenerative medicine and drug delivery. The research will exploit classical engineering principles to increase understanding of the ways that cells receive information from materials, and what happens to cell function over time when assembled within three-dimensional microenvironments. The final goal of his research program is to design novel surfaces for understanding the underlying biology of diseases such as Alzheimer’s, breast cancer and liver failure and engineer novel therapeutic approaches. 

Srivatsan Kidambi, Ph.D.

Jung Yul Lim, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering
University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Dr. Jung Yul Lim received his Ph.D. at Seoul National University, Korea and was trained as a post-doc at Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine.  His current research aims to reveal the role of focal adhesion, cytoskeletal tension, cell-cell interaction, and immune response in cells sensing and responding to biomaterials and mechanical signals.  The crosstalk between extracellular milieus and cell signaling cascades in cell-biomaterial interaction and mechanotransduction revealed through his study will provide high impact mechanistic data for biomaterials science, mechanobiology, obesity, and regenerative medicine. 

Jung Yul Lim, Ph.D.

Angela K. Pannier, Ph.D.
Biomedical Engineer and Associate Professor
Department of Biological Systems Engineering
University of Nebraska - Lincoln

The goal of the Pannier Lab is to understand and design innovative biomaterials and gene delivery systems to advance biotechnology, diagnostics, fundamental understanding of embryology and tissue development, and regenerative medicine therapies. Research projects are focused in three areas nonviral gene delivery, tissue engineering, and protein-cell-biomaterial interactions. In nonviral gene delivery, our aim is to determine and understand the mechanisms that render cells responsive to the transfer of genetic material (e.g. DNA). In the tissue engineering, our objective is to develop biomaterial scaffolds and culture systems to understand and promote tissue, organ, and organism development, regeneration, and growth. Within the protein-cell-material interaction, projects aim to make use of a novel combinatorial spectroscopic ellipsometry and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation analytical technique to uncover new and unique information on processes that occur at biomaterial interfaces. The experiments in the Pannier Lab provide valuable insights to the fields of gene delivery and biomaterials, with very promising potential for future scientific discovery and translation to therapeutic, biotechnological, and tissue engineering applications.

 AK Pannier

Jingwei Xie, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy
Special Scientist, Regenerative Medicine Program

Xie laboratory’s research interests center on the synthesis, surface modification, self-assembly of materials at nanometer scale to address problems in the field of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and drug/gene delivery. Our research programs are built upon interdisciplinary subjects including materials science, engineering, biology and medicine. We develop novel, smart biomaterials with well-controlled composition, structure and functional properties. We employ analytical tools in materials science, biology and medicine to characterize these biomaterials as either scaffolds or drug/gene carriers. Specifically, we are interested in use of nano-structured materials together with signaling molecules to regulate cell/stem cell behaviors for regenerating various types of tissues including tendon-to-bone insertion site, cartilage, bone, skin, cardiac muscle, and nerve. We are also interested in developing nano-structured materials for enhancing survival, proliferation, and function of human islets in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, we are interested in developing nanofibrous materials as local drug delivery devices for prevention of surgical site infection.

Jingwei Xie, Ph.D.