Simulation

Survey SAYS:

Below are the responses received from our questions posed in November/December.

IAE Simulation Interest Group Survey Responses-Nine Respondents

 

  1. Have you been involved in the creation of simulation training for students? If so, elaborate.

 

  • no
  • Yes-both POE grant work and National grants
  • PT and joint Nursing/PT simulation activities-created with colleagues from PT and Nursing as well as PT clinician and clinical skills lab personnel.  Other sim is done with               SP’s about stroke care in acute setting-created with PT clinician
  • beginning to develop simulation training for Operating Room Safety
  • virtual treatment machine and SPS in oncology department
  • multiple experiences, primarily research focus
  • LP, TPA administration and eye exam
  • worked for Immersion Medical/CAE for 20 years creating advanced surgical skills training simulations
  • sterile compounding interaction in iWall, Mock Patient interviews, Point of Care testing on SP, Demonstration for Moodle
  • SP Chest examinations, High-fidelity mannequin simulated PT treatment, Non-Tech simulation of cardiac rehabilitation using students as patients and therapists

 

  1. Have you led or participated in the delivery of simulation training for students? Please explain.

 

  • no
  • Have helped many times in nursing
  • simulation training for about 7 years. I also assist other faculty with their sims in our PT curriculum
  • Simulation training for Operating Room Safety
  • work with clinical coordinator to assist in the operations of simulation training.
  • yes
  • LP and TPA administration, eye exam
  • no
  • lead delivery cases
  • yes both, I have led the simulations- SP Chest examinations, High-fidelity mannequin simulated PT treatment, Non-Tech simulation of cardiac rehabilitation using students as patients and therapists as well as “acted” in the mannequin simulation

 

  1. Simulation for student learning takes time to develop, test, validate and operationalize. DO you feel the benefits outweigh the effort?  Why or why not?

 

  • Yes, As a student, I did find that simulations are one of the most valuable teaching tools because it provides us with the opportunity to get comfortable with a concept or skill and to make mistakes in a learning environment, all the while preparing us to execute those skills and concepts more confidently
    • Yes, You just have to ensure that the experience is valuable to the learner
    • Yes, Student feedback is very positive. All our faculty believe simulation offers the opportunity to view our students’ performance before they go to the clinic
    • Yes, In our simulation modality is the best (if not only) way to teach /assess the specific learning objectives required.
    • Yes, It shows areas for improvement
    • Yes
    • Yes, It is worthied when you cannot do the training with a patient
    • Yes-Realism, accuracy and complications are critical for training and thus take tremendous efforts and time to develop. They must be thoroughly tested to assure they are true to the skill being taught and predictable/reliable in their performance.
    • Yes, the benfits are worth the effort, because time put into the development up front saves time in the long run and provides a quality, modern method of content delivery/assessment
    • Yes, our students report positive learning outcomes. Our clinical instructors (preceptors) comment on how welll our students are prepared for clinical practice and demonstrate professionalism in their interactions with patients

 

 

  1. From your viewpoint, what benefit (s), if any, does simulation provide for students?

 

  • Yes, As a student, I did find that simulations are one of the most valuable teaching tools because it provides us with the opportunity to get comfortable with a concept or skill and to make mistakes in a learning environment, all the while preparing us to execute those skills and concepts more confidently
  • A chance to fail in a safe space. Teamwork opportunities
  • They always want realistic chances to practice, so this offers lower stakes opportunities
  • Provides environmental variables as well as opportunities for observational assessments that are difficult (and sometimes impossible) to replicate in a module and/or quiz.
  • It shows areas for improvement
  • A safe learning environment for the learner and patients
  • The ability to fail/make mistakes without dire consequence is key to successful learning.
  • Simulation puts the student in a ‘real-life’ mock situation to prepare for the task in the work environment. It takes textbook and lecture to a hands-on learning that garners questioning and work through that would not otherwise present itself. Simulation is the best way to garner a practice-ready learner.
  • Simulation challenges the students to synthesize cognitive and psychomotor skils that they have learned in multiple classes. The students are able to reflect on their professional growth and development in the program.  This provides them with a different viewpoint of their learning than exam scores on didactic work.

 

 

  1. Do you feel the use of simulation for training of patient care lessens the humanistic touch/care perspective for students? Why or why not?

 

  • Yes, learning about a skill is one thing but when you’re actually employing the skil you realize the physical and emotional effect procedures can have on patients so you want to do your best and most compassionate job. Doing a simulation prepares you for actually employing the skills while practicing how to do it compassionately and efficiently.
  • It helps to develop muscle memory for when the real thing occurs.
  • The extent they choose to engage in the simulation, they can get a feel for working with a real patient. But ultimately, it is a simulation and so it should be viewed as a teaching method.
  • There’s nothing better than the real thing. Simulation provides the next best thing and/or can provide a much safer training experience.
  • Not as long as it is supplemental education
  • Not necessarily. One training does not replace the other.  Simulation enhances.  It does not take away from real life encounters.
  • It depends on the focus and thoroughness of the simulation. I think that is often overlooked in simulation and medical training in general.
  • No-I use standardized patients therefore keeping the human touch. Also, debriefing with a professor/instructor accentuates the human touch.
  • No, our students and clinical instructors comment on how the simulations actually help develop the softer skills. (Our simulation s use SPs, peers and mannequins).  It is important that our grading rubrics emphasize interpersonal skills as well as the psychomotor skills.

 

  1. Obtaining real clinical experience/training continues to be a challenge for healthcare programs. What amount of simulation experience do you think would be acceptable to serve as a replacement for actual clinical experiences?

 

  • 15% simulation would be beneficial. Especially in the early stages
  • There are standards from different groups. I think 2:1 is fairly common. Clinical: Simulation
  • We view it as preparation for actual clinical experience not a substitute
  • Unable to answer this question…but as simulation training improves and becomes more efficient, opportunities for increased utilization will be (and are) plentiful
  • 20%
  • It depends on the skill that we are trying to teach. Each is different
  • I do not think there is a set amount that is the same for everyone. I think a student and patients benefit from the student utilizing simulation until they are comfortable and confident enough to apply the skill to actual patients.
  • I don’t think simulation should replace actual clinical experience. Rather, simulation is a tool to prepare for clinical experience and to review a questionable event that occurred during actual clinical as a means to work through an appropriate response to the event.
  • I believe simulation can supplement classroom work and better prepare the students for clinical rotations. Simulation can also be used to train students in less common clinical experiences (wound care and cardiac arrest for PT students).  I don’t believe it can replace clinical rotations as the repetition of patients (12-14 in one day) and dynamic environment cannot be replicated in simulation.

 

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