Focus on Forensics

BHECN partnered with the University of Nebraska Public Policy Center (NUPPC) for four-part webinar series, Focus on Forensic Mental Health:

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(Click to view PowerPoint Slides)

Promoting Healthcare Provider Safety: A Comprehensive Approach

This presentation addresses specific strategies to reduce the likelihood of violence in healthcare settings. From systems-level infrastructure to local workgroup protocols and individual actions, data-driven approaches for promoting provider safety are the focus of this presentation.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this learning activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Delineate the fundamental elements of health care violence prevention programs essential for promoting provider safety.
  2. Identify three strategies individuals may deploy for increasing personal safety in clinical settings.
  3. Identify clinically relevant protective factors that decrease the likelihood of violent behaviors in health care and other venues.

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Presented by:
Lynn M. Van Male, PhD, CTM
Dr. Lynn Van Male is an internationally recognized subject matter expert on behavioral threat assessment and management in health care and human services settings.

In addition to holding an appointment as an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Oregon Health and Sciences University, Dr. Van Male is a Licensed Psychologist and the national Director of the Workplace Violence Prevention Program for the largest integrated healthcare system in the United States. She currently holds the elected office of Second Vice President on the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals (ATAP) national Board of Directors.

Dr. Van Male is one of the first ATAP Certified Threat Managers (CTM), having beta-tested the CTM examination. She served on the Scientific Committee for the 4th, 5th, and 6th International Conferences on Violence in the Health Sector; was an invited member of the National Quality Partners Action Team to Prevent Healthcare Workplace Violence, and serves as a Contributing Editor of the Journal of Threat Assessment and Management.


 

Mental Health Courts

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this learning activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Recognize the impact of the failures of the national mental health policy of de-institutionalization, which gave rise to the criminalization of persons with mental illness and co-occurring disorders. 
  2. Identify the precipitating problems in Broward County's criminal justice system and the capacity of the community to collaborate to promote behavioral health, recovery and public safety. 
  3. Relate the evolution of problem-solving courts in the United States to challenges faced today, beginning with the first Drug Court established in Miami-Dade County in 1989.
  4. Identify the values, mission and goals of Broward's Mental Health Court through the application of therapeutic jurisprudence.

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Presented by:
Judge Ginger Lerner-Wren

Judge Ginger Lerner-Wren was elected County Court Judge in 1997, criminal division, and appointed to establish the nation's first problem-solving mental health court. The Court is dedicated to the safe diversion of persons arrested with serious mental illness and co-occurring substance use disorders to community-based treatment and services. Broward's Court is a national and global model.
 
Recognition's she has received include: Model for The America's Law Enforcement and Mental Health Project signed into law by President Bill Clinton in 2000. The Court was showcased at The White House Conference on Mental Health. In 2002, President George W. Bush appointed Judge Wren to the President's New Freedom Commission of Mental Health, where she chaired the Criminal Justice Sub-Committee.

In 2013, Judge Wren was selected "Top Finalist" HiiL Foundation, Innovating Justice Award, The Hague. In 2015, National Council for Behavioral Health awarded Judge Wren the "Excellence in Advocacy Award" for Elected Service. Judge Wren is the author of "A Court of Refuge: Stories From the Bench of America's First Mental Health Court, Beacon Press, 2018.

She is an Adjunct Professor at the Nova Southeastern University (NSU) College of Psychology and Neuroscience and serves on The National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, EXCOM.

Patients & Prisoners: The Evolving Role of Correctional Psychiatry

This presentation is designed to give a broad overview of issues which arise in the psychiatric treatment of individuals who are incarcerated in jails or prisons.

We hope our talk will be accessible to those who currently work or are interested in working in corrections. We will discuss the epidemiology of mental illness in corrections, common psychiatric diagnoses, and medication management. We will discuss unique challenges which arise for clinicians working in a correctional environment. We will also touch on special topics of interest such as suicide, segregation, prisoners' medical rights, and the competency to stand trial.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this learning activity, participants will be able to:
  1. Describe historical processes that have led to the growing number of mentally ill individuals in correctional settings over recent decades.
  2. Identify the roles and responsibilities of the psychiatrist and other members of the correctional mental health team.
  3. Delineate challenges with providing psychopharmacotherapy in the correctional environment and some practical ways to address these challenges.

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Presented by: Dr. Jacqueline Landessbrian_holoyda.jpg

 and Dr. Brian Holoyda

 

Jacqueline Landess MD, JD
Dr. Jacqueline Landess is board certified in forensic and general psychiatry and currently serves as the Associate Training Director of the Forensic Psychiatry Fellowship at the Medical College of Wisconsin and works at a state forensic hospital, local additions clinic, and maintains a private practice.
Dr. Landess has used her dual training in medicine and the law to study and serve individuals with psychiatric illness who are justice-involved.

She is the former Chief of Mental Health Services at the St. Louis County Jail and, while there, served as a psychiatric consultant to a felony mental health court.

Dr. Landess has worked on various advocacy and public policy initiatives to improve access to healthcare services for minority and under-served populations who are justice-involved.

She has published and presented nationally on a variety of forensic topics. She remains actively involved in several academic organizations, including the Group for Advancement of Psychiatry, where she serves as the Psychiatry & the Law Committee's co-chair.

Brian Holoyda, MD, MPH, MBA
Dr. Holoyda is a forensic psychiatrist, and he completed his medical degree at Northwestern University and his psychiatry residency and forensic psychiatry fellowship at UC Davis Medical Center. Clinically, he treats patients at the Martinez Detention Facility in the Bay Area. His areas of forensic expertise include violence risk assessment and paraphilic disorders. His academic interests include sexual offending, animal cruelty, and psychedelic psychopharmacology.


Limiting Liability: A Clinical Forensic Psychologist Perspective

This presentation is designed to give a broad overview of issues which arise in the psychiatric treatment of individuals who are incarcerated in jails or prisons.

We hope our talk will be accessible to those who currently work or have an interest in working in corrections. We will discuss the epidemiology of mental illness in corrections, common psychiatric diagnoses, and medication management. We will discuss unique challenges which arise for clinicians working in a correctional environment. We will also touch on special topics of interest such as suicide, segregation, prisoners' medical rights, and the competency to stand trial.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this learning activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Define what is meant by "structured professional judgment."
  2. Identify five different risk assessment variables that are associated with potential violence.
  3. Describe a clinical forensic psychologist's role as a consultant to a treatment team or as part of a threat assessment team.

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Presented by: Dr. Scott A. Bresler

Scott A. Bresler, PhD, is a clinical forensic psychologist, Associate Professor at the University of Cincinnati, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Neuroscience. He serves as Clinical Director of the Division of Forensic Psychiatry and Director of Psychology Assessment Services at The University of Cincinnati Medical Center. His responsibilities include coordinating and performing risk assessments for violence that emerge in various community settings, including the workplace, schools, and within institutionalized settings (hospitals, jails, prisons).

He regularly performs violence risk assessments in civil and criminal court cases and has consulted with multiple law enforcement agencies, regionally and nationally. Dr. Bresler has crafted workplace violence policies that have been implemented in both private industry and large public agencies, and he has helped establish their Threat Assessment Teams.

Dr. Bresler has trained staff at various agencies to recognize the risk for violent situations and how to respond to such. He performs fitness-for-duty assessments for both pre-employment positions with security concerns and post-employment (e.g., medical doctors, nurses, police, fire personnel, air traffic controllers, lawyers).

Dr. Bresler has served as an expert witness in legal cases and provided testimony addressing various issues, including trial competency, criminal responsibility, death penalty mitigation, and suspected false confessions. His expertise has been solicited by both state attorneys general and defense and prosecution attorneys across the country. He is licensed to practice psychology in multiple states.

 

Webinar Series Sponsor

Public Policy Center Logo

This webinar series is sponsored by the University of Nebraska Lincoln, Public Policy Center. Learn more about the Public Policy Center

For More Information: Contact the UNL Public Policy Center