العربية

Archive for July, 2016

After Losing My Husband to Cancer, Nursing Saved My Life

Sara-nurse-OHSCUSara Weging is a nurse on the Oncology Hematology Special Care Unit at Nebraska Medicine.

I always knew I was meant to help people, but it wasn’t until I met a very special person that I was able to recognize how I was supposed to achieve that goal.

As a new undergrad, fresh out of high school, I felt that the world was completely open to me. I could do anything I set my mind to – what I wanted to do was nursing.

Luckily, my university had a week immersion program for perspective nursing students to make sure that nursing was the correct fit. By the end of the week, all twenty students were sitting around a large oak table going on and on about how nursing was the career for them. When it got to be my turn to speak, all I could muster was an emphatic, “No way!” I could not fathom the thought that I would be responsible for another human life. I had just graduated high school, moved out on my own and was expected to take care of myself for the first time. I was in NO WAY ready for the huge responsibility that is nursing.

So, I pushed nursing to the back of my mind and moved on to other pursuits. Fast forward fours years later, I was a new graduate moving to Chicago and ready to take on the world. Life in Chicago was not easy, but it was new and exciting. I craved adventure. Adventure found me in many ways, but the best way by far was in the form of my amazing husband, James. It didn’t take long for James and I to find adventures of our own and for both of us to enjoy the city in new and exciting ways. Whether it was touring the different neighborhood festivals, taking in a White Sox game or simply sitting on the great lawn in Millennium Park, life was great and neither one of us wanted it to change.

Right before Thanksgiving 2011, we received a phone call that forever changed our lives. James, when he was sixteen, was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). He underwent treatment with chemotherapy and by the time we met, he was five years into remission. Unfortunately for us, that Thanksgiving would not be a day of thanks, but a day of worry and dread.

After a routine clinic visit, James received the call that his cancer had returned. Together, we returned to the life that he thought he was done with. This new world of clinics and hospitals was completely foreign to me. To turn and run would have been all too easy and honestly, expected. But, James handled everything with such courage. Every time he would look at me with his big blue eyes, all I could feel was the enormous amount of love I had for him. He was my sun in a sky full of dark clouds.

So, I charged forward and did everything in my power to help James. I didn’t want him to feel like he was “the man with cancer,” yet again. At first, it was the small things – taking him to clinic visits, making sure we had food in the apartment that he had an appetite for, keeping the apartment clean and just trying to keep our lives as normal as possible. Making cancer something that was a part of our lives – but not the thing that defined it.

Sara-and-James

Sara’s husband, James, lost his battle with leukemia in 2012.

As time when on and treatment continued, James grew increasing sick. I decided to take time away from my day job and become his full time caregiver. This was not an easy decision to make, but it was killing me to be away from him. James would have to stay in the hospital for multiple days and he would never say it, but I could always see it in his eyes – he hated to see me leave.

Soon, I was learning how to clean and dress any wounds that he may acquire, how to hook him up to hydration when he was getting to dehydrated, mix medications together, keeping track of more pills than I had ever seen and how to give shots. This was a world that I had once envisioned for myself, but in a very different setting. It alarmed me at how comfortable I had become in such a short amount of time. I felt myself watching the nurses to see how they interacted with patients and how they performed certain tasks. The nursing staff quickly became more like friends than anything else. They were people that I could openly share my fears, share plans for our future and truly anything that was on my mind. They were the ones that were there during the hard nights, holding my hand and giving me words of encouragement.

The nursing staff was with James and me until the every end. At 8:52 a.m. on August 12, 2012, James took his final breath. After only two and a half years together, I had to tell the love of my life goodbye.

After James died, I was a wreck. I couldn’t eat or sleep. All I could do was sit and cry. Cry over not only losing the love of my life, but also losing my future – a future I desperately wanted. I felt like I was drowning and everyone around me was just watching me struggle as they continued on with their lives. Life for me continued in this fashion for about two years. Once I started to come out of the fog that was now my life, I couldn’t figure out what to do. What next? Surely, I couldn’t live in my mother’s basement for the rest of my life, curled up in blankets that were saturated with tissues and stained from tears.

It was at this time that I remembered nursing. I remembered taking care of James for all those months and not only loving the fact that I got to take care of him, but knowing that I wanted to do that for others as well. I vowed that I would give anything I had left to other families going through exactly what I had gone through – hopefully making James proud along the way.

I applied for the accelerated nursing program at Creighton University and within a year’s time, I was Sara Weging, BSN, RN. I started working in the Oncology Hematology Special Care Unit (OHSCU) at Nebraska Medicine – Nebraska Medical Center. I could not ask for a more perfect job.

Being in the OHSCU is oddly comforting and feels a little like home. Not only being able to take care patients at the most vulnerable points in their lives, but being able to bond with the families. I love it when my experiences are able to be shared and help others that are in similar situations as I was. I truly believe the patients and families on OHSCU are a very special group of people. It’s a gift when I can tell them I know exactly how you feel. They are not alone.

There are still days when I feel very lost. When something funny is on TV, or a special song plays on the radio, I find myself turning to talk to James about it. Then there are days that I wake up and pray it was all a bad dream. When I realize it’s not, I feel like I have lost him all over again.

It has been really hard to live each day like I know James would want me to. He wouldn’t want me to cry over him. He would want me to go on living and he most definitely wouldn’t want me to give up on my dreams. Nursing is slowly bringing me back to life and helping me realize that it is okay to move forward. Life doesn’t stop moving just because I fell off the ride

Mother Hears Son’s Heart Beating for First Time in Three Years


April is National Donate Life Month, a time to raise awareness about organ donation and celebrate those who have given the ultimate gift of life. On April 1, a unique event took place at Nebraska Medicine – Nebraska Medical Center involving heart transplant patient Terry Hooper and his donor’s family.

In June 2003, Hooper was diagnosed with cardiomyopathy, a disease of the heart muscle in which the heart loses its ability to pump blood effectively. In April 2005, doctors at Nebraska Medicine discovered Hooper’s aortic valve was leaking – something that had probably gone undetected since birth. He underwent an aortic valve replacement, but his heart was still only functioning at 30 percent. By August 2012, his heart function had declined to 5 percent and he was placed on the transplant waiting list in October of that year. After being on the list for 52 days, Hooper received a heart transplant on Dec. 10, 2012.

Lisa and Terry Meet
On April 1, Lisa Swanson met Terry Hooper, the Nebraska Medicine patient who received her son’s heart.

At the time, Hooper had no idea his donor was 18-year-old Levi Schulz of Horace, N.D. Levi was killed in an automobile accident Dec. 7, 2012. His body was kept on life support so that his organs could save others.

In the spring of 2013, Hooper wrote a letter to his donor family. That May, he received a letter from Levi’s mom, Lisa Swanson. Over the years, they continued to correspond, but never spoke on the phone or met face to face.

Lisa-and-Terry-meet

On Friday, April 1, Hooper met Levi’s mom and twin brother, Shelby Schulz, for the first time.

The family got to see and hear Hooper’s heart beating through an echocardiogram. At the end of the meeting, Hooper surprised Swanson with a HeartBeat Bear that had a recording of his heartbeat.

Nebraska Medicine is home to one of the most reputable and well-known organ transplant programs in the country. It’s one of a few institutions nationwide to offer all solid organ transplants under one roof.

Nature study suggests pathway to possible HIV-1 cure

Kalani Simpson

Fletcher011Courtney Fletcher, Pharm.D.

An international team of scientists – among them Courtney Fletcher, Pharm.D., dean of the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy – this week published a study in the journal Nature, which shows findings that suggest a pathway to a possible cure for HIV-1 infection. The print edition of the journal hits newsstands today (Thursday).

The work builds upon a 2014 publication in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, of which Dr. Fletcher was first author, which investigated the question of why, despite being driven to undetectable levels in blood by powerful antiretroviral drugs, HIV is never fully wiped out in patients with the disease.

In that study, Dr. Fletcher and colleagues found that a much lower concentration of the drugs made it to lymph node and lymphoid tissues, allowing viral replication – and persistence – of reservoirs of HIV in those tissues.

Finding out why low levels of HIV were hanging on, “for the first time allowed us to have a scientific-based conversation about a cure – is it possible?” Dr. Fletcher said.

This latest study takes it a step further – and finds that while the levels of drug concentration that make it to those tissues are too low to wipe out HIV, the virus also has not developed a resistance to those drugs, as might usually be expected. In the current paper, the authors suggested this is likely because the levels of the drugs are so low, there was no reason for the virus to develop resistance.

“In simple terms, we think there is no evolutionary advantage to have developed a resistance,” Dr. Fletcher said.

And if it has no drug resistance, the scientists may have found a pathway to a possible cure.

“Can we deliver more drug to these tissues and see if we can shut down replication?” Dr. Fletcher said. That’s the next problem to solve.

“Will this cure HIV? No one knows,” Dr. Fletcher said. “But it is a very rational, evidence-based approach.

“This is a problem that we are extremely well positioned here at Nebraska to address. We think this problem of ongoing viral replication in lymphoid tissues may be solved by enhanced drug delivery, and that’s something that we here at UNMC are really good at.”

Already, Dr. Fletcher has a significant grant application in with the National Institutes of Health, and he is optimistic that UNMC will be tasked with finding a way to deliver enough drugs to the hard-to-reach places where the last remaining bits of HIV hide out.

“We believe we are one of the few places in the country – with some help from experts in virology around the country,” he emphasized – “to do this work.”

An international collaboration

Dr. Fletcher stressed that it took an international collaboration of top-notch academic medical centers, each bringing its own world-class expertise, to take on a project like this.

For example:
• Investigators at the University of Minnesota, with which Dr. Fletcher has long collaborated, recruited the patients into the original study, obtained the plasma and tissue samples, and measured the amount of virus in the tissues;
• Northwestern University researchers explored the evolution of the HIV virus;
• University of Oxford scientists took the lead on the mathematical side; and
• Researchers at the University of Edinburgh, in Scotland, brought to life the story of how the virus changes its genetic makeup.

Investigators at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, in Seattle, the University of Porto, in Portugal, the University of California, San Diego, Korea National Institutes of Health, and King’s College London also made crucial contributions.

Dr. Grant elected councilor-at-large for ASTS

By Tom O’Connor, UNMC public relations

Grant0609Wendy Grant, M.D.

Wendy Grant, M.D., a transplant surgeon for UNMC/Nebraska Medicine, has been elected councilor-at-large for the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, an organization that includes more than 2,000 transplant surgeons, physicians, scientists and allied health professionals from around the globe.

Dr. Grant has been active in ASTS since 2005. She is currently chair of the Fellowship Training Committee, which is responsible for overseeing the accreditation of all transplant surgery fellowship training in the U.S. She also serves as co-leader of the Exam Development Group and as a member of the Certification Task Force.

“I am just delighted for Dr. Grant,” said David W. Mercer, M.D., professor and chair of the UNMC Department of Surgery. “This signifies a logical extension of her recognition by the ASTS and is richly deserved. It also represents continued recognition by the ASTS for our transplant team at UNMC/Nebraska Medicine, as our faculty have held many prestigious officer positions within the organization. I would anticipate Wendy climbing the ladder too as her star continues to shine brighter and brighter in academic surgery.”

Alan Langnas, D.O., professor of surgery-transplant at UNMC and chief of the Transplant Center at Nebraska Medicine, served as president of ASTS in 2014.

“Dr. Grant has been a national leader in transplantation for many years and is so deserving of being elected by the membership of the ASTS to its council,” Dr. Langnas said. “The ASTS and UNMC/Nebraska Medicine are fortunate to have an individual of her skills and vision help move the field into the future.”

Dr. Grant, who is professor, surgery-transplant, at UNMC, also serves as assistant dean for student affairs and chair of the curriculum committee for the College of Medicine. She was one of the leaders in the College of Medicine’s recent reaccreditation by the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education. She also has been one of the individuals tasked with pushing forward a curriculum redesign for the medical school.

The ASTS is dedicated to excellence in transplantation surgery. Its mission is to advance the art and science of transplant surgery through leadership, advocacy, education, and training.

Loading