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Archive for October, 2016

Heart Failure Patient Becomes Mother

Sarah Hawthorne gave birth to her baby at the same hospital that evaluated her heart defect shortly after she was born.

Sarah Hawthorne gave birth to her baby at the same hospital that evaluated her heart defect shortly after she was born.

Sarah Hawthorne Writes About Her Experience with Our Partnership with Children’s Hospital & Medical Center

May 22, 2016, was a day that changed my life forever. I gave birth to a healthy, 7 pound 7 ounce baby boy at the Nebraska Medical Center. Thirty-one years earlier, I had been airlifted to that same hospital because I was born with a congenital heart defect. Little did my family know then, how much the pediatric and adult congenital heart cardiology teams would become a part of our family.

I was born in the small town of Minden in central Nebraska. The physician that delivered me could tell that something wasn’t quite right. He had me transported to a hospital in Kearney where they decided to airlift me to Omaha. It was there that I was diagnosed with transposition of the great arteries (TGA) – a serious but rare heart defect.

I had open-heart surgery eight months later, and now, as a parent, I am only somewhat able to imagine how incredibly hard that must have been for my parents. Thankfully, everything went well, and I was able to live a fairly normal life as an energetic, active child.

When I was 7-years-old, I went into congestive heart failure and was once again sent to Omaha. This time, at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center. I was given a pacemaker and began my journey with cardiologist John Kugler, MD. Since then, I have had two more pacemakers, several heart catheterizations and another open-heart surgery in 2015.

Sarah Hawthorne after her heart surgery when she was 7 years old.

Sarah Hawthorne after her heart surgery when she was 8 months old.

My pregnancy further added to my team. I was under the care of Nebraska Medicine cardiologist Shane Tsai, MD, and the maternal-fetal medicine specialists at the med center. I moved to Omaha for my last month of pregnancy to ensure that the delivery went smoothly.

On May 22, our baby boy was born healthy and without any heart problems that I could have possibly passed on. Since then, I have continued to see Dr. Tsai and the Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ACHD) team.

What the medical facts don’t illustrate, though, are the relationships that have formed over the years with our doctors and nurses at Children’s and Nebraska Medicine. It’s amazing how Dr. Kugler remembered so much about me even when he was only seeing me once a year.

Toward the end of my 20s and early 30s, I developed some arrhythmias that required more frequent appointments. The interest the doctors and nurses took in my life and family was unnecessary, and yet always made me feel loved and cared for.

Dr. Kugler and his nurse, Kris Houston, even drove three hours to attend my wedding, and when we had our baby at the med center, Kris came to the hospital to visit. As I transition to the ACHD team at Nebraska Medicine, I know those relationships will develop into trusting, caring, and loving relationships as well. This, to me, is what sets these two teams apart from everyone else. They are very knowledgeable about my heart condition and take great care of me medically – all while making me feel extremely important to them as a person.

On top of all of this, they helped me achieve something I only dreamt of for many years – becoming a mother.  And for that, I will be eternally grateful to the Pediatric and ACHD teams.

To learn more about the importance of the ACHD clinic at Nebraska Medicine and the unique relationship they have with Children’s, read this blog from Dr. Tsai.

Surgical Robot Less Invasive, Allows Quicker Recovery

9-14-davinci-procedure

Kolby Baber suffered from a rare digestive disorder that made it difficult, and sometimes impossible, for him to swallow. After trying several other treatments, Baber discovered Dmitry Oleynikov, MD. Dr. Oleynikov told Baber about a new surgical robot, the daVinci Xi, which would be the perfect way to fix his problem. The daVinci features two work stations for Dr. Oleynikov and one of his colleagues to work simultaneously on patients instead of one like the previous model. It also allows surgeons to work on a wider range of cases than they could previously.

See how Dr. Oleynikov used the first daVinci Xi in Omaha for the first time to make Baber’s problem disappear in this video.

New Technology Tapped to Teach Sepsis

Clinical Effectiveness Team Utilizes UNMC’s iEXCEL for Interactive Training

It’s an opportunity for our health care team to learn in a new way: utilizing state-of-the art technology. Our clinical educators are taking advantage of UNMC’s iEXCEL advanced visualization, experiential and learning hub to help our nurses learn about the origins of sepsis and its impact on the body’s organs.

The iEXCEL visualization hub inside the Sorrell Center features MultiTaction panels, often referred to as iWall, that generate an interactive display wall that can detect an unlimited number of fingers, hands and infrared pens to incorporate a level of experiential learning. The simulation and virtual reality training will enhance training of current and future health professionals.

Jessica Strickler, clinical educator for MICU and SICU and Sara Hooper, clinical educator for 8 Telemetry are one of the first to partner with Ben Stobbe, executive director for Clinical Simulation, iEXCEL, to use the technology for our staff training on sepsis.

“We met with Ben and three student workers and described what we wanted the education to look like,” says Strickler, who together with Hooper, researched much of the content of the education.

Micah Beachy, DO, Clinical Effectiveness medical director, provided his expertise on sepsis’ impact on the body’s organs. After four more meetings, the interactive training was ready to go.

This 30-60 minute iWall training, called “Sepsis iWall Education,” is encouraged for nurses, but not required. Nurses who complete it will receive one hour of CEU. To register for class time, log into Apollo. Classes are being offered before and after shifts. Review the training schedule here.

iEXCEL is the programmatic component of UNMC’s Global Center for Advanced Interprofessional Learning.

Jessica Strickler, clinical educator for MICU and SICU, is seen demonstrating the new sepsis education.

Jessica Strickler, clinical educator for MICU and SICU, is seen demonstrating the new sepsis education.

Breakthrough Treatment for Peripheral Artery Disease

We’re among the first in the United States to offer a new treatment recently cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to provide relief for patients suffering from the painful symptoms of peripheral artery disease, or PAD – a condition caused by a build-up of plaque that blocks blood flow in the arteries of legs or feet.

The device, Avinger’s Pantheris™ lumivascular atherectomy system, is an innovative image-guided therapy that, for the first time ever, allows physicians to see and remove plaque simultaneously during atherectomy – a minimally invasive procedure that involves cutting plaque away from the artery and clearing it out to restore blood flow.

Because the Pantheris device incorporates real-time optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging on a therapeutic catheter – like having a small camera on the tip of the device – physicians are able to remove this plaque more precisely than ever before, with less risk of damage to the artery walls which can result in aggressive scarring that greatly increases the risk of restenosis, or re-narrowing of the artery. In the past, physicians have had to rely solely on X-ray as well as touch and feel to guide their tools while they try to treat complicated arterial disease.

For patients, this safe and more-precise treatment may potentially reduce the need for follow-up procedures and stents.

“Peripheral artery disease greatly impacts quality of life, with patients experiencing cramping, numbness, discoloration and pain,” says vascular surgeon David Vogel, MD. “The Pantheris technology is on the front lines. Nebraska Medicine is the only hospital in the region using it. We’re helping lead the way.”

David Vogel, MD, is seen using this new device on a patient during atherectomy – a minimally invasive procedure that involves cutting plaque away from the artery and clearing it out to restore blood flow.

David Vogel, MD, is seen using this new device on a patient during an atherectomy – a minimally invasive procedure that involves cutting plaque away from the artery and clearing it out to restore blood flow.

Clinical results confirm that the technology is safe and effective: a 130-patient study showed a target lesion revascularization rate of just 8 percent, and not a single event of vessel perforation, clinically significant dissection or late aneurysm resulted from Pantheris. In addition, this radiation-free technology may help minimize radiation exposure to clinicians and patients by decreasing use of fluoroscopy.

KMTV recently featured one of our patients who underwent the procedure.

Peripheral artery disease affects nearly 20 million adults in the U.S. and over 200 million people globally. PAD is caused by a build-up of plaque in the arteries that blocks blood flow to the legs and feet. Often dismissed as normal signs of aging, symptoms of PAD include painful cramping, numbness or discoloration in the legs or feet. PAD can become so severe and difficult to address with traditional treatments that patients and physicians often resort to undergoing invasive bypass surgeries, which can result in even higher health risks and lengthy, painful recoveries. In severe cases, patients often face amputation, the worst-case scenario associated with PAD.

Atherectomy is a minimally invasive treatment for PAD in which a catheter-based device is used to remove plaque from a blood vessel. Lumivascular technology utilized in the Pantheris system allows physicians, for the first time ever, to see from inside the artery during a directional atherectomy procedure by using an imaging modality called optical coherence tomography, or OCT. In the past, physicians have had to rely solely on X-ray as well as touch and feel to guide their tools while they try to treat complicated arterial disease. With the lumivascular approach, physicians can more accurately navigate their devices and treat PAD lesions, thanks to the OCT images they see from inside the artery.

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