External Advisory Committee

External Advisory Committee

William Mobley William Mobley, MD, PhD 
External Advisory Committee Member 

Dr. William Mobley is the Chair of Department of Neurosciences at University of California San Diego. Dr. Mobley is a clinician and researcher who is internationally known for his work on degenerative diseases of the central nervous system such as Alzheimer’s disease and the neurobiology of Down syndrome. Dr. Mobley serves as the Chair of the CoNDA Center's External Advisory Committee.

Patricia Reuter-Lorenz, PhD

Patricia Reuter-Lorenz, PhD
External Advisory Committee Member

Dr. Patricia Reuter-Lorenz is the Chair of the Department of Psychology and the Michael I. Posner Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of Michigan. Dr. Reuter-Lorenz serves as a member of the CoNDA Center’s External Advisory Committee. Her research investigates how aging affects the neural and cognitive mechanisms of attention, working memory and executive control.

Rick Bevins

Rick Bevins, PhD 
External Advisory Committee Member 

Dr. Rick Bevins is the Chair of Department of Psychology at University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Dr. Bevins is also the director of the Rural Drug addiction Research Center, another COBRE center in NE.  Dr. Bevins’ expertise is in neuroscience, pharmacology and animal learning and behavior. Dr. Bevins uses preclinical animal models to elucidate the behavioral, neural, and pharmacological factors involved in the etiology of drug abuse.

 

Tallie Baram Tallie Z. Baram, MD, PhD 
External Advisory Committee Member 

Tallie Z. Baram is the Danette Shepard Professor of Neurological Sciences at the departments of Pediatrics, Anatomy/Neurobiology and Neurology at UC-Irvine. Dr. Baram is a child neurologist and developmental neuro-scientist who has focused her efforts on the influence of early-life experiences on the maturation of brain circuits, and on the underlying mechanisms. She has been studying this broad topic in two contexts: a) How early-life experiences including adversity/stress (ELA) influence resilience and vulnerability to cognitive and emotional disorders; and b) how early-life seizures, especially those associated with fever, can convert a normal hippocampal circuit into an epileptic one. Dr. Baram has strong track-records in transdisciplinary science and the use of cross-species and cutting-edge molecular, epigenetic, viral-genetic and MR imaging methods. The Baram lab has pioneered innovative, robust models of ELA and for febrile status epilepticus, adopted world-wide, and identified structural, cellular and molecular / epigenetic mechanisms of the resulting cognitive sequelae. Professor Baram’s work has been widely cited (>27,000 times; H =92, google scholar), and has been internationally recognized leading to NIH Javits merit award and research awards from the CNS, ANA AAN and AES. Dr. Baram has strived to contribute to the scientific community by, for examples, chairing NIH study sections and involvement in editorial boards and external advisory boards, including CoNDA’s. Dr. Baram has a passion and commitment to mentoring: She is PI of a T32, and mentor of several recently funded NIH K awardees. Her prior trainees, from diverse ethnicities, countries and backgrounds, are now contributing independently to Academic Neuroscience.