Retirement tea Friday for Joyce Rogge

by Nebraska Medicine | August 01, 2019

Image with caption: Joyce Rogge, APRN in the liver transplant program, retires Friday after a 32-year career at UNMC and Nebraska Medicine. Her nursing career began in 1969 at Lincoln General Hospital in Lincoln, Neb., on the medical-surgical floor and has been one of great satisfaction.

Joyce Rogge, APRN in the liver transplant program, retires Friday after a 32-year career at UNMC and Nebraska Medicine. Her nursing career began in 1969 at Lincoln General Hospital in Lincoln, Neb., on the medical-surgical floor and has been one of great satisfaction.

She's been a nurse for 50 years. Now, Joyce Rogge, acute care nurse practitioner for the liver transplant program, is ready for something new. Her last day at Nebraska Medicine is Friday, Aug. 2.

There will be a retirement tea for Rogge from 1:30-3:30 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 2, at the University Tower, Private Dining Room C.

Rogge began her career at the medical center at UNMC's College of Nursing in 1987, working as a research nurse with Mara Baun, Ph.D., on her National Institute of Health (NIH)'s research studies. In 1990, she joined the liver transplant team in the UNMC College of Medicine as a transplant nurse coordinator. Rogge went back to school for her acute care and primary care APRN certification and in 2004, transitioned to her current role, working in acute care for the liver transplant program.

She became an employee of Nebraska Medicine in early 2015, during the integration of UNMC Physicians and The Nebraska Medical Center.

"I have loved helping patients and their families through very difficult times in their lives," she said. "It's often the worst time of their lives and I appreciate being able to care for them."

Rogge says it was in the beginning of 2019 she made the decision to retire this summer.

"I knew I would work until I was 70," she said. "Then I turned 70 and I thought, 'I'll work for another year and see.'"

"Within the transplant department, Joyce has become a pillar of knowledge and mentorship for those she has worked with throughout the years by providing education to nursing staff, fellows, residents, students and fellow APPs," said supervisor Tracy Hanzek, UNMC administrator of the organ transplant program. "She is beloved by her patients for her empathy, advocacy, and support she has provided through some of the most difficult times of their lives."

"I will enjoy this last week of my career," Rogge said. "I've enjoyed all the people I've met and the opportunity to learn something new every day. It's been a wonderful career and I will miss it."

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