Research Seminar Series

The UNMC Water, Climate and Health Program is pleased to host a Research Seminar Series featuring updates on the exciting research being conducted by our program and affiliates. The goal of the series is to disseminate our work and stimulate thoughtful feedback from stakeholders. See the schedule below and stay tuned for updates!  

Seminar Dates:


Tuesday, October 11, 2022 | 12:00-1:00 CT – Drought and Human Health

Summary: Droughts are slow-evolving natural disasters and the associated health impacts are delayed and indirect. Droughts reduce water quality and quantity, cause poor air quality, increase likelihood of fires and intensity of heat waves, which in turn contribute to poor health outcomes. The Water, Climate and Health Program is engaged in a variety of research activities related to better understanding the human health impacts of drought. Speakers will share our latest research results related to drought’s impact on mortality, mental health, and air quality in Nebraska and beyond. Speakers will detail the goals of the program’s currently funded research from NASA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) and how this information is applicable locally and globally.  

View and download the event flyer here

Speakers:

150xjessebell.png Jesse E. Bell, PhD - Claire M. Hubbard Professor of Water, Climate and Health, College of Public Health, UNMC 
150xazar-abadi.png Azar M. Abadi, PhD - Research Assistant Professor, College of Public Health, UNMC


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Tuesday, November 15, 2022 | 12:00-1:00 CT – Water Quality and Pediatric Cancer

Summary: In Nebraska, groundwater contamination of atrazine and nitrate is widespread. Atrazine exposure in drinking water is associated with various negative reproductive outcomes such as pre-term delivery, low birth weight, and birth defects. Nitrate exposure in drinking water is also associated with many negative health outcomes such as methemoglobinemia (“blue baby syndrome”), specific types of cancer and birth defects. Further inquiry into the relationship between exposure to these waterborne agrichemicals and human health is particularly salient for Nebraskans as one in five citizens rely on private wells for drinking water, which are not routinely tested or regulated by the Safe Drinking Water Act.  

Nebraska has one of the highest pediatric cancer rates in the nation. This presentation will feature a presentation of results and discussion on a recent study from UNMC and UNL researchers showing a relationship between groundwater atrazine and nitrate concentrations and incidence of pediatric cancers in Nebraska.

View and download the event flyer here

Speaker:

150erogan.jpg Eleanor G Rogan, PhD - Professor and Interim Chair of the Department of Health Promotion, College of Public Health, UNMC 


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Tuesday, December 6, 2022 | 12:00-1:00 CT – 2022 Lancet Countdown on Human Health and Climate Change, Featuring a Discussion on Air Quality and Health in Nebraska

Summary: The Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change is an annual report designed to disseminate the latest research findings related to the public health impacts of climate change. Presenters Jesse Bell and Rachel Lookadoo will describe the key points of this year’s report and discuss what this means for the Great Plains region. Presenter Jagadeesh Puvvula, PhD will discuss his research results related to air quality and human health in Nebraska and the presenters will discuss the broader context of how climate change can impact air quality.  

View and download the event flyer here

Speakers:

150xjessebell.png Jesse E. Bell, PhD - Claire M. Hubbard Professor of Water, Climate and Health, College of Public Health, UNMC 
150xrlookadoo.png Rachel Lookadoo, JD - Assistant Professor, College of Public Health, UNMC 
Jagadeesh Puvvula, PhD Jagadeesh Puvvula, PhD - Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine 


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Tuesday, February 28th, 2023 | 12:00–1:00 p.m. CST — Extreme Heat and Human Health

Summary: Heat exerts a severe toll on communities in the United States, with an average annual mortality rate twice that of storms and floods. Further, scientific research demonstrates that climate change will cause more frequent, more severe and longer heat waves in the future.  

This webinar will feature results from two of our program’s heat health research projects, which examine heat vulnerability in Nebraska in both urban and rural areas.  

Specifically, speakers will discuss results from the Omaha Urban Heat Watch Project, a citizen-science campaign designed to identify “urban heat islands” and heat disparities in Omaha.  

Speakers will also describe results from a study that examined heat vulnerability across Nebraska based on “level of urbanization” and socioeconomic influences. An especially unique project, this research examines vulnerability to heat in rural areas (in addition to urban), whereas most heat health research focuses solely on highly populated areas. 

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Coming up next in 2023!

March – Climate Change, Patient Outcomes and Healthcare Delivery 

April – See What We’re Funding! Water Quality Projects Funded by the Water, Climate and Health Program