Peripheral Arterial Disease

Peripheral Arterial Disease

Angioplasty and stenting for atherosclerotic occlusive disease in the arteries supplying the legs (Peripheral Arterial Disease) is the most common endovascular procedure outside of the heart, but carries the highest rate of reconstruction failure. The underlying reasons for these poor results are not completely clear, but the main arterial segment within the leg, the femoropopliteal artery, appears to be significantly different from other peripheral arteries, possibly because of lower blood flow, but more importantly because it undergoes large deformations during flexion of the limb. These severe deformations are reflected clinically by the high incidence of stent fractures in this arterial segment.

Our research is focused on detailed understanding and quantification of the complex mechanical environment of the femoropopliteal arterial segment in order to determine optimal patient and lesion-specific treatment options for patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease. To achieve this we are utilizing human cadaver models, large animal models, mechanical and structural characterization, and constitutive and computational modeling.