Sexual Harassment
What is sexual harassment?  

Sexual Harassment - Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:

  • Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or academic standing.
  • Submission to, or rejection of, such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment decisions or academic decisions affecting such individual.
  • Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working/academic environment.

Sexual harassment does not include personal compliments welcomed by the recipient and social interaction of relationships freely entered into by students, employees, or prospective employees; however the potential for sexual harassment even in consensual relationships must be recognized, especially in situations where a professional power differential exists (e.g., administrator/student, faculty/student, supervisor/employee, tenured/non-tenured faculty.) Sexual harassment does not include behavior which is considered to be appropriate to an academic discipline for the purpose of instruction or individual safety.

Who perpetrates sexual harassment?  
Perpetrator can be anyone regardless of gender, age, ability, sexual orientation, gender identity, socio-economic status or race. They do not have to be the opposite sex of the victim. This is to include but not limited to the victim's supervisor, a client, a co-worker, a teacher or professor, a schoolmate, a stranger, even a family member.
Who are victims of sexual harassment?  
Sexual harassment can happen to anyone regardless of gender, age, ability, sexual orientation, gender identity, socio-economic status or race. The victim does not have to be the person directly harassed but can be anyone who finds the behavior offensive and is affected by it.