Lung Transplant Program Begins at Nebraska Medicine

One of a Few Institutions Nationwide Offering All Solid Organ Transplants

Nebraska Medicine is home to one of the most reputable and well-known organ transplant programs in the country. In the decades since the first transplant in 1970, its nationally and internationally renowned specialists have performed thousands of heart, liver, kidney, pancreas and intestinal transplants. After years of planning and preparation, the organization is launching a comprehensive Lung Transplant Program. The addition makes Nebraska Medicine one of a few institutions nationwide to offer all solid organ transplants under one roof.

“We are thrilled to offer this lifesaving treatment,” says Heather Strah, MD, medical director of lung transplantation. “The addition of lung transplantation takes Nebraska Medicine’s already elite solid organ transplant program and elevates it to the highest level in the country.”

Nebraska Medicine first offered a lung transplant program in 1995, which remained in operation until 1998. The program now looks to once again shape the field of patient care, offering a multidisciplinary team of surgeons, physicians, respiratory therapists, psychologists, social workers, dietitians, nurses and others. Professionals will provide patients support from pre-evaluation to long-term follow-up care.

“A transplant program requires a large team of people pulling in the same direction,” says lung transplant surgical director Aleem Siddique, MD. “This program is the product of a great deal of hard work. It will allow us to provide world-class care to the people of Nebraska and surrounding states.”

Patients will no longer need to travel hundreds of miles for treatments of end-stage lung disease. Nebraska Medicine’s program will also assume the care of appropriate patients who received lung transplants at other institutions.

“Patients who have been transplanted far from Omaha often have a tremendous burden on them,” says Dr. Strah. “The time and financial resources required to receive follow-up care can be astonishing. With our new program, patients will have expert care close to home while ensuring superior care coordination with their transplant center. In addition, patients who were too ill to travel and receive a transplant may now be candidates locally.”

Nebraska Medicine’s Lung Transplant Program will offer single lung, double lung and heart-lung transplants. Although the transplant process is very unpredictable, clinicians hope to evaluate 20-30 patients and transplant 10 patients in the first year. Some diseases that may require a lung transplant include cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and many other chronic lung diseases.

“Patients who survive their first year after transplant are typically expected to survive seven or eight years,” says Dr. Strah. “But, there are lots of patients I follow who were transplanted 10, 15, 20 years ago and are still enjoying relatively good health. That’s what we want for everyone. We want nothing more than to provide the best treatment possible for those who walk through our doors.”

Along with extraordinary patient care, the program will provide lung education, research and innovation. Clinicians will also work to promote the importance of organ donation.

“Nationally, it’s estimated that 18 people die every day while waiting for organ transplants,” says Dr. Siddique. “A single donor may save up to eight lives. For the donor or their family, it’s an opportunity for altruism that may be deeply rewarding.”

To register as an organ donor, visit www.donatelifenebraska.com. To learn more about the Lung Transplant Program at Nebraska Medicine, visit NebraskaMed.com/Transplant.

 

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