Matthew Rizzo, M.D., F.A.A.N.

Matthew Rizzo, M.D., F.A.A.N.

Francis & Edgar Reynolds Chair & Professor- Department of Neurological Sciences
Co-Director, Nebraska Neuroscience Alliance
Director of Neuroscience Services (Neurology, Neurosurgery, Mental Health, Pain Management)

Clinical Practice:
Academic Office:
4242 Farnam Street, Suite 650
North Doctor's Tower
Omaha, NE 68131
Phone: 402-559-8600
Fax: 402-559-9510
988440 Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha, NE 68198-8440
Phone: 402-559-4496
Fax: 402-559-3341

Administrative Assistant:
Josh Russo 402-552-2921

Education:
Columbia University, New York (1975)
John Hopkins University School of Medicine, MD (1975)
University of Iowa College of Medicine, Internal Medicine Internship (1979-1980)
University of Iowa College of Medicine, Neurology Residency (1980-1983)
University of Iowa College of Medicine, Fellow Associate in Neurology (1982-1983)
University of Iowa College of Medicine, Fellowship, Behavioral Neurology and Cognitive Neuroscience (1982-1986) 

Hospital Appointments:
University of Nebraska Medical Center 

Interests:
Memory Disorders 

Biographical Sketch:
Dr. Rizzo is the Professor and Chair of the Department of Neurological Sciences at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and Co-Director of the Nebraska Neuroscience Alliance. Dr. Rizzo received his M.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, MD. He also attended the University of Iowa in Iowa City, IA to complete his residency in neurology and his fellowship in Behavioral Neurology and Cognitive Neuroscience. Prior to joining the UNMC faculty in April 2014, Dr. Rizzo was a Professor of Neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine; Vice Chair of Transitional and Clinical Research, Department of Neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine and also the Director of the Aging Brain and Mind Initiative, Office of Provost at the University of Iowa. Currently Dr. Rizzo is seeing patients with Memory Disorders and participating in several studies related to addressing behavioral consequences of aging and neurological disorders.